CNoW

International Workshop on the Changing Nature of Work with ICT

About

Introduction
International Workshop on Changing Nature of Work with ICT (CNoW) will gather researchers and practitioners interested in researching the ongoing transformation of work incurred by the fast development of information and communication infrastructures. As the nature of work is deeply embedded in the fabric of our society and life, its transformation has implications in broad areas, such as economic development, individual work and organizational performance, sustainability of modes of work and well-being, division of labor and specialization, competence development and education, careers and lifetime perspectives on work. Outcomes of this workshop may provide a sneak preview on new ways of working and organizing work and collaboration.
Background
Information Communications Technology (ICT) is fundamentally changing the way we work and live. ICT changes with whom we work through open collaboration, social connectivity, or intelligent networking. It changes what we do and how we do it affecting our quality of life as we move from manual and routine tasks to knowledge work. It allows us to work in flexible time such as freelancing or creating garage ventures. It affects where we work through telecommuting, telework, mobile work, or our home office. And, it affects the way we work. New patterns of digitally-mediated business communications for employees’ collaboration, coordination, and cooperation, overcome physical differences of time and place in working with others, while new forms of freelancing and contracting of projectized knowledge intensive work is becoming a viable and sustainable alternative to the full time employment model of work. With the rise of "open" social network on the Internet, physically distributed individuals and organizations may work together on ICT platforms worldwide. Thus, new terminologies are evolving around this evolving new ways of working, such as smart work, working smarter., future of work, new way of work, etc.
Goal
To promote, facilitate and disseminate research on the changing nature of work with ICT, ultimately targeting to promote adequate and positive applications of emerging technologies meeting needs of humans and society.
Affiliations
CNoW is the official workshop for IFIP 9.1 (ICT and Work), and currently runs as a preconference workshop for AIS conferences, such as ICIS, AMCIS, PACIS, and ECIS.

9th Hyderabad

Hyderabad 2020: 9th CNoW
9th CNow will be conducted as a Joint Working Conference with IFIP 8.2 and IFIP 9.4
- IFIP 8.2 Information Systems and Organization
- IFIP 9.1 ICT and Work
- IFIP 9.4 Social Implications of Computers in Developing Countries
Hyderabad, India, December 10. – 11. 2020
The Future of Digital Work: The Challenge of Inequality
Keynote speakers
  • Renana Jhabvala, social activist associated with the Self-Employed Women’s Association (SEWA)
  • Michael Barrett, Professor from U. of Cambridge, UK with a long-standing interest in digital work and innovation
Program Chairs
Eric Monteiro, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Rajendra Bandi, Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore
Ranjini Raghavendra, Public Health Foundation of India
Stefan Klein, University of Muenster, Germany
Shirin Madon, London School of Economics
Conference Chairs
Helena Karsten, Åbo Akademi University
Jungwoo Lee, Yonsei University
Shirin Madon, London School of Economics
Rajesh Chandwani, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad

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Digital technologies, so much more than mere ‘tools,’ seep into and shape our everyday lives in unprecedented, hence uncharted, manners. Digitalisation is both an enabler and multiplier for far-reaching transformation of private and
professional lives, at individual, community, organizational, industry-wide and societal levels. However, digital transformation
also raises challenges of better or worse quality of life and work, social inclusion/exclusion, (non)discrimination,
(un)employment, and civic (non)participation.

Digitalisation plays a key role in the way we live our lives and is transforming what it means to work. From new ways of restructuring existing work including an increasing ability to work from virtually anywhere, to collaborating across geographical regions. At the same time, job-matching sites are changing and expanding the way individuals look for work and how companies identify and recruit talent. Independent workers are increasingly choosing to offer their services on digital platforms challenging conventional ideas about how and where work is undertaken. Advances in robotics, artificial intelligence and machine learning are ushering a new age of digitalisation and automation as machines match or outperform human performance in a range of work activities, including ones requiring cognitive capabilities. Digitalization will have far-reaching impact on the global workforce involving independent contractors, freelance gig workers, fissured work and outsourced services. The changing nature of work through digital platforms is leading to new ways of control, coordination and collaboration within and between organisations and individual workers.
The changes will not only challenge the existing work models, but also influence wages, income and skills. Major transitions lie ahead and could lead to income polarisation and inequality. Technology hubs and online work centres tend to be located in urban areas and operate in English, encouraging investment by policy makers in infrastructure such as roads and transport while neglecting to support the more traditional sectors such as agriculture or artisanal industry in rural areas. This implies digitalization is deeply implicated in the changes required to address our global challenges such as the United Nations Millennium Development Goals for health, education, wellbeing and security or as put by Thomas Piketty (2014),
the challenges of inequality.
The notion of the ‘digital divide’ between the global South and North, while much discussed in academic and policy literature raises numerous issues as a result of the changing nature of work (Allen 2017; Avgerou and Walsham 2017; Roberts et al. 2014). Differences in opportunities are presented to individuals, communities, or organisations by technologies, mainly as a consequence of deficits in access to the technologies, capacity to use them, relevant contextual content and appropriate application. How then does inclusion into the digital economy operate? Inclusion is not just a mirror image of exclusion, and that to achieve inclusion, it is not sufficient to curb exclusion mechanisms, but to enhance positive measures of inclusion. As Herbst (1974) put it to underscore the social significance of work, “the product of work is men”. However, participation in work-life is highly varied across a number of dimensions including gender, developed vs developing regions, temporal vs permanent employment, migrant workers, entrepreneurship opportunities. The dichotomy between online and ‘real’ life is dismantling, making our online behaviour embedded into rather outside of our everyday lives (Faraj et al. 2011). Digital online platforms are vehicles for community building and sharing, for instance in the form of open source or crowdsourcing. Simultaneously, the traces we willingly if not always consciously leave of our online lives is the source of tech companies’ harvesting of behaviour data for their own commercial purposes (Zuboff 2019).
The IFIP Working Groups 8.2, 9.1 and 9.4 have a long history of supplementing the dominant technology-push accounts of digitalization with socially informed ones. This joint conference brings together these three groups for the much-needed analysis of the social pre-conditions, engagement and consequences of digitalization visibility. With increasingly vocal proclamations of the consequences of digitalisation, there is a need for socially informed analysis of the uptake of digitalisation for work and everyday life in the manner traditionally promoted by all three of the IFIP working groups. The conference seeks to stimulate and encourage critical discussion of potential shifts in the changing world of work, organisations and its implications in the developing world.
The venue for the joint IFIP conference is Hyderabad, India. Hyderabad and Bangalore are key manifestations of the ongoing struggle of the Global South to tap into, not to say drive, the new digital economy. The conference will facilitate a reflection and discussion about the experiences with India’s efforts so far. With a population exceeding 1.2 billion, India is important in itself but even more so as an early and ambitious example of engaging in the value generation of the digital economy.
For the joint IFIP WG 8.2, 9.1 and 9.4 conference in 2020 we are seeking rigorous and relevant empirical (qualitative and quantitative) studies as well as conceptual and theoretical papers apprising digitalisation in terms of the future of work, organizing and development.
We solicit full research papers with maximum length of 8000 words. The submission site will open in early March and close on May 27, 2020. Notification about acceptance will be sent on July 30.The accepted full papers will be included in the proceedings.
We also solicit research-in-progress papers in the form of extended abstracts, with maximum length of 2000 words plus references. The submission deadline for these is September 10, with notification of acceptance a month later. These papers will be worked on in thematically grouped Paper Development Sessions and they will not appear in the proceedings.
If coming from a developing country as classified by the United Nations, authors with accepted papers can apply for travel grants.
Important Dates :
December 9,2019                       Second call for papers distributed
May 27, 2020                                Deadline for submitting full papers
July 30, 2020                                Notification of accepted full papers
September 10, 202                    Deadline for submitting research-in progress papers
October 20, 202                          Notification of accepted research-in-progress papers
December 10 – 11, 2020         Conference in Hyderabad, India
References:
Allen, J.P. (2017). Technology and inequality: concentrated wealth in a digital world. Palgrave.
Avgerou, C, and Walsham, G. eds. (2017) Information technology in context: Studies from the perspective of developing countries. Routledge, 2017.-
Faraj, S., Jarvenpaa, S. L., & Majchrzak, A. (2011). Knowledge collaboration in online communities. Organization science, 22(5), 1224-1239.
Herbst, P. G. (1974). Socio-technical Design: Strategies in Multi-disciplinary Research. London: Tavistock Publications. Piketty, T. (2014). Capital in the Twenty-First Century. Harvard University Press.
Roberts, J.T., Hite, A. B. & Chorev, N. (Eds.) (2014). The Globalization and Development Reader: Perspectives on Development and Global Change,2nd Ed.Wiley-Blackwell.
Zuboff, S. (2019). The age of surveillance capitalism: the fight for thefuture at the new frontier of power. Profile Books.

8th Munich

Munich 2019: 8th CNoW
December 15, 2019
Pre-ICIS Workshop in Munich, Germany [IFIP 9.1 Workshop]

Digital Ecosystems and the Changing Nature of Work: Reconfiguring technology, practices, and organizations
The program for the workshop is available here
A zip file with all papers for the round table sessions is available here
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Keynote Speakers :
  • Michael Barrett, University of Cambridge, Judge Business School
  • Manju Ahuja, University of Louisville, College of Business

Deadline for extended abstract submission: 25 September 2019
Notification of acceptance/rejection decisions: 18 October 2019  

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Workshop Description
The nature of work in organizations is changing to accommodate new forms of organizing through emerging digital technologies like platforms, AI, robotics, 3D printing, among others. While potentially transforming work, digital technology also has deep effects on employee engagement and how meaning is formed in day to day work. For example, crowd working platforms now span organization boundaries and, in fact, have led to forms of work where it becomes almost irrelevant to which organizations individuals belong or whether they belong to a particular organization at all. Digital ecosystems emerging from these changes can thus be highly decentralized and more flexible in terms of when, where, and how we work. Yet there are also multiple adverse effects associated with these emerging patterns of work, for example too much connectivity and managing boundaries of work and personal life. Ultimately digitalization is transforming the workplace and organizing, including new forms of leadership, governance structures and individual responses to digital ecosystems. These and other issues related to digital ecosystems and the changing nature of work will be explored in this workshop.

You are invited to submit extended abstracts about your research (maximum 5 pages) related to the changing nature of work. Indicate whether this is a completed research project or research-in-progress. At the workshop, a combination of short presentations and discussions will be used to facilitate the exchange of ideas.
Potential topic areas include (but are not limited to):
  • Emerging new patterns of work in digital ecosystems
  • Digital working and workplace technologies
  • Algorithmic management
  • Digital infrastructures of work
  • Modern work space as a combination of physical and digital environments
  • Changing spatial and temporal dimensions of work
  • Work fragmentation and nomadic work practices
  • New forms of virtual teamwork and virtualization of work
  • Transparency and open collaboration
  • New technology-enabled forms of employee participation and engagement
  • Gig economy, crowdwork
  • Impact on professions and labor through digitization and automation
  • Changing patterns of leadership, leadership in the digital age
  • Impact of the digital workplace on work-life balance and boundary management
IFIP WG 9.1 Business Meeting
All workshop attendees and anyone interested in IFIP WG 9.1 are encouraged to attend the WG bsuiness meeting that will follow the workshop at 5 pm. At the business meeting, we will discuss future workshops and working conferences, and conduct other working group related business.
Program Chairs
Bart van den Hooff, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (b.j.vanden.hooff@vu.nl)
Lauri Wessel, University of Bremen (lauri.wessel@uni-bremen.de)
Program Committee:
  • Margunn Aanestad, University of Agder
  • John Baptista, Warwick Business School
  • Ivo Blohm, University of St. Gallen
  • Abayomi Baiyere, Copenhagen Business School
  • Jonny Holmström, Umea University
  • Lars Hornuf, University of Bremen
  • Julia Kotlarsky, University of Auckland
  • Sven Laumer, FAU Erlangen Nuremberg
  • Christian Maier, University of Bamberg
  • Christian Meske , Freie Universität Berlin
  • Mareike Möhlmann, Warwick Business School
  • Manuel Nicklich , FAU Erlangen Nuremberg
  • Roxana Oogeanu-Taddei, University of Montpellier
  • Steve Sawyer, Syracuse University
  • Daniel Schlagwein, University of Sydney Business School
  • Martha Snyder, Nova Southeastern University
  • Mari-Klara Stein, Copenhagen Business School
  • Burt Swanson, University of California Los Angeles
  • Monideepa Tarafdar, University of Lancaster
IFIP 9.1 Chairs
Jungwoo Lee, Hitotsubashi University/Yonsei University (jlee@yonsei.ac.kr)
Stefan Klein, University of Muenster (Stefan.Klein@wi.uni-muenster.de)
Mary Beth Watson-Manheim, University of Illinois Chicago (mbwm@uic.edu)

7th Xian

Xian 2019: 7th CNoW Changing Nature of Work (CNoW) with ICT
How are work routines, tasks, jobs and employment re-shaped and reinstitutionalized in the 4th Industrial Revolution?
The program for the workshop is available here
A zip file with all papers for the round table sessions is available here
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At PACIS 2019, Xi'an, China
It is proposed to have a participatory workshop at PACIS 2019 where people can discuss their ideas on the Changing Nature of Work. The theme of PACIS 2019 relates to the 4th Industrial Revolution and states that “with the progress of fourth industrial revolution driven by Artificial Intelligence, autonomous vehicles and drones, and 3D Printing, the restructure of employment and industry reallocation can happen”. Therefore, the nature of work in organizations is changing to accommodate new forms of organizing through modern digital platforms. Digital technology transforms jobs and tasks but also has deep effects on employee engagement and how meaning is formed in day-to-day work and employment. While there is more flexibility in terms of when, where, and how we work, there are also multiple adverse effects associated with these emerging patterns of work. For example, constant connectivity may seriously interrupt the workflows, and 24/7 work patterns may blurs the boundaries of work and personal life. Ultimately, digitalization is transforming the workplace and organizing, including leading to new forms of leadership, governance structures and individual responses to these new patterns of work. These and other issues related to the digital workplaces which may change the routines of work and task as well as patterns of employment will be explored in this workshop. The workshop will be run in conjunction with the IFIP 9.1 work group.
Potential topic areas include (but are not limited to):
Emerging new patterns of work
Digital working and workplace technologies
Algorithmic management
Digital infrastructures of work
Modern workspace as a combination of physical and digital environments
Changing spatial and temporal dimensions of work
Work fragmentation and nomadic work practices
New forms of virtual teamwork and virtualization of work
Transparency and open collaboration
New technology-enabled forms of employee participation and engagement
Gig economy, crowdsourcing
Impact on professions and labor through digitization and automation
Changing patterns of leadership, leadership in the digital age
Impact of the digital workplace on work-life balance and boundary management
Important Dates:
  • May 22 abstracts submission deadline (single page abstract, 700 words maximum excluding references)
  • May 29 acceptance notification
  • June 11 final abstract submission
  • July 11, workshop from 2pm to 6pm in Xi'an
Submission Instructions:
Prospective attendees are invited to submit a one page abstract (including title and authors names) about their research related to the changing nature of work. Accepted authors will have an opportunity to discuss their ideas in breakout discussions in a round table format at the workshop.
Submissions should be emailed to any one of the organizers:
brian.donnellan@mu.ie
jlee@yonsei.ac.kr
caishun@xmu.edu.cn

6th San Francisco

San Francisco 2018: 6th International Workshop on the Changing Nature of Work (CNoW) : Bridging the Workplace of People, Data and Things

The program for the workshop is available here
A zip file with all papers for the round table sessions is available here
*****
The CNoW Pre-ICIS workshop will be held in San Francisco, USA on Thursday, December 13, 2018, from 9:00-17:00. This will be the sixth meeting in the series (Milan, Italy – Dec. 2013, Muenster, Germany – May 2015, Ft. Worth, TX, USA – Dec. 2015, Dublin, Ireland - Dec. 2016, Seoul, South Korea - Dec. 2017). The 2018 workshop is co-sponsored by IFIP WG 9.1 (ICT and Work) and Center for Work Science at Yonsei Univeristy, and supported by SIGOSRA.

Notes:
The IFIP Working Group 9.1 (ICT and Work) business meeting will be held at the conclusion of this workshop.
Our exciting workshop program is now online.
Get an overview of the accepted papers and download the papers for reading.
Workshop description:
The nature of work in organizations is changing to accommodate new forms of organizing through modern digital platforms. Digital technology transforms jobs but also has deep effects on employee engagement and how meaning is formed in day to   day work. While there is more flexibility in terms of when, where, and how we work there are also multiple adverse effects associated with these emerging patterns of work, for example too much connectivity and managing boundaries of work and personal life. Ultimately digitalization is transforming the workplace and organizing, including leading to new forms of leadership, governance structures and individual responses to these new patterns of work. These and other issues related to  the digital workplaces bridging people, data and things will be explored in this workshop. You are invited to submit extended abstracts about your research (maximum 5 pages) related to the changing nature of work. Indicate whether this is a completed research project or research-in-progress. A combination of short presentations and discussions will be used to facilitate the exchange of ideas.

Potential topic areas include (but are not limited to) :
  • - Emerging new patterns of work
  • - Digital working and workplace technologies
  • - Algorithmic management
  • - Digital infrastructures of work
  • - Modern workspace as a combination of physical and digital environments
  • - Changing spatial and temporal dimensions of work
  • - Work fragmentation and nomadic work practices
  • - New forms of virtual teamwork and virtualization of work
  • - Transparency and open collaboration
  • - New technology-enabled forms of employee participation and engagement
  • - Gig economy, crowdsourcing
  • - Impact on professions and labor through digitization and automation
  • - Changing patterns of leadership, leadership in the digital age
  • - Impact of the digital workplace on work-life balance and boundary management
Keynote Speakers :
  • Dubravka Cecez-Kecmanovic (Professor, UNSW Business School) will talk about "Approaching the New Ways of Working processually: exploring emergence and becoming"
  • Marleen Huysman (Professor, Head of KIN Research, VU Amsterdam) will talk about "Studying Analytics at Work: A Social Practice Perspective"
Important Dates :
  • Sep. 24, 2018 : Extended abstracts due. SUBMISSION SYSTEM IS NOW CLOSED.
  • Oct. 19, 2018 : Notification of acceptance
Additional Details :
Paper submission site : https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=cnow2018
Paper template: Extended abstract template
At least one author of an accepted paper must register for the workshop. You can register for the workshop
1. with ICIS registration at https://icis2018.aisconferences.org/register/
2. without ICIS registration at https://aisnet.org/store/view_product.asp?id=12361155
(Those registering for the ancillary event only will have a $25 additional charge.)
Workshop Program Chairs :
  • Bart van den Hooff, VU Amsterdam (b.j.vanden.hooff@vu.nl)
  • Joao (John) Baptista, Warwick Business School (J.Baptista@wbs.ac.uk)
  • Mari-Klara Stein, Copenhagen Business School (ms.digi@cbs.dk)
Workshop Program Committee :
  • Margunn Aanestad, University of Oslo
  • J.P. Allen, San Francisco University
  • Michel Avital, Copenhagen Business School
  • Ana Canhoto, Brunel University
  • Jonny Holmström, Umeå University
  • Julia Kotlarsky, University of Auckland
  • Mareike Möhlmann, Warwick Business School
  • Steve Sawyer, Syracuse University
  • Daniel Schlagwein, University of Sydney
  • Martha (Marti) Snyder, Nova Southeastern University
  • Burt Swanson, UCLA Anderson School of Management
  • Carsten Sørensen, London School of Economics
  • Monideepa Tarafdar, Lancaster University
  • Lauri Wessel, University of Bremen, Germany
IFIP WG 9.1 Officers :
  • Chair : Jungwoo Lee, Yonsei University
  • Vice Chair : Stefan Klein, University of Muenster
  • Secretary : Mary Beth Watson-Manheim, University of Illinois Chicago

5th Seoul

Seoul 2017: 5th International Workshop on the Changing Nature of Work (CNoW):Transforming Work with Digital Innovation

The program for the workshop is available here
A zip file with all papers for the round table sessions is available here
*****
The CNoW Pre-ICIS workshop will be held in Seoul, South Korea on Sunday, December 10, 2017, from 9:00-15:00. This will be the fifth meeting in the series (Milan, Italy – Dec. 2013, Muenster, Germany – May 2015, Ft. Worth, TX, USA – Dec. 2015, Dublin, Ireland - Dec. 2016). The 2017 workshop is co-sponsored by SIG-OSRA.

Notes:
The IFIP Working Group 9.1 (ICT and Work) business meeting will be held at the conclusion of this workshop.
Workshop description:
The nature of work in organizations is changing to accommodate new forms of organizing through modern digital platforms.  Digital innovation transform jobs but also has deep effects on employee engagement and how meaning is formed in day to day work. While there is more flexibility in terms of when, where, and how we work there are also multiple adverse effects associated with these emerging patterns of work, for example too much connectivity and managing boundaries of work and personal life. Ultimately digital innovation is transforming the workplace and organizing, including leading to new forms of leadership, governance structures and individual responses to these new patterns of work. These and other issues related to the impact of digital innovation on work will be explored in this workshop.   You are invited to submit extended abstracts about your research (maximum 5 pages) related to the changing nature of work. Indicate whether this is a completed research project or research-in-progress. A combination of short presentations and discussions will be used to facilitate the exchange of ideas.

Potential topic areas include (but are not limited to) :
  • - Emerging new patterns of work
  • - Digital working and workplace technologies
  • - Job crafting with IT
  • - Gamification of work
  • - Changing spatial and temporal dimensions of work
  • - Work fragmentation and nomadic work practices
  • - New forms of virtual teamwork and virtualization of work
  • - Transparency and open collaboration
  • - New forms of employee participation and engagement
  • - e-Lancing and freelancing movement
  • - Impact on professions and labor through digitization and automation
  • - Changing patterns of leadership forms of organizing
  • - Impact on work-life balance and boundary management
  • - Well-being in the workplace
Workshop Keynote Speakers :
  • Jeffrey V. Nickerson,
  • Machines are rapidly increasing their capabilities with respect to cognitive tasks. Researchers can help design more interesting jobs that use learning machines.  Higher human productivity and improved job satisfaction are the desired outcomes. The likelihood of achieving these outcomes can be increased by building a research network that spans disciplines, creates a vision, and strives for convergence. Convergence involves finding a common language for those in different disciplines to use, as well as identifying ways of benchmarking and sharing progress in multiple domains. Professor Nickerson is an investigator on an NSF convergence award dedicated to building a research network related to the changing nature of work, and his talk will discuss ways of involving workshop participants in the network and the research to follow.
Important Dates :
  • Sep. 18, 2017: Extended abstract due. DEADLINE EXTENDED TO Sep. 25, 2017. Submission system is now closed. 
  • Oct. 16, 2017: Notification of acceptance Additional Details:
Additional Details :
Paper submission site : https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=cnow2018
Paper template: Extended abstract template
At least one author of an accepted paper must register for the workshop. You can register for the workshopxx
You can register for the workshop at https://icis2017.aisnet.org/register/
Workshop Program Chairs :
  • Joao (John) Baptista, Warwick Business School (J.Baptista@wbs.ac.uk)
  • Mari-Klara Stein, Copenhagen Business School (ms.digi@cbs.dk)
  • Sue Conger, University of Dallas (sue.conger@gmail.com)
  • Masaaki Hirano, Waseda Business School (masaaki.hirano@gmail.com)
  • Gyoo Gun Lim, Hanyang Business School (ggseer@gmail.com)
Workshop Program Committee :
  • J.P. Allen, San Francisco University
  • Jonny Holmström, Umeå University
  • Tina Blegind Jensen, Copenhagen Business School
  • Elizabeth Regan, University of South Carolina
  • Nancy Russo, Malmö University
  • Steve Sawyer, Syracuse University
  • Martha (Marti) Snyder, Nova Southeastern University
  • Burt Swanson, UCLA Anderson School of Management
  • Monideepa Tarafdar, Lancaster University
  • Bart van den Hooff, Vrije University Amsterdam
  • Lauri Wessel, Freie Universität Berlin
IFIP WG 9.1 Officers :
  • Chair : Jungwoo Lee, Yonsei University
  • Vice Chair : Stefan Klein, University of Muenster
  • Secretary : Mary Beth Watson-Manheim, University of Illinois Chicago

4th Dublin

Dublin 2016: 4th CNoW - The Impact of Digital Innovation on Work

The program for the workshop is available here
A zip file with all papers for the round table sessions is available here
*****
Call for Submissions
The CNoW Pre-ICIS workshop will be held in Dublin, Ireland on Sunday, December 11, 2016, from 9:00-15:00. This will be the fourth meeting in the series (Milan, Italy – Dec. 2013, Muenster, Germany – May 2015, Ft. Worth, TX, USA – Dec. 2015). The 2016 workshop is co-sponsored by SIG-OSRA.

Notes:
The SIG-OSRA business meeting will be held during the workshop lunch break.
The IFIP Working Group 9.1 (ICT and Work) business meeting will be held at the conclusion of this workshop.
Workshop description:
In our increasingly connected world, the nature of work is changing.  Digital innovation has led to the emergence of new types of jobs, while other jobs have become obsolete. There is more flexibility in terms of when, where, and how we work.  ICT has enabled greater accessibility to a variety of jobs by eliminating barriers due to physical, visual, or other restrictions.  Along with the positive impacts of digital innovation, there are also potential negative impacts of ICT on the workplace, particularly regarding new methods of employee monitoring and the blurring of boundaries between home and work.  These and other issues related to the impact of digital innovation on work will be explored in this workshop.

You are invited to submit extended abstracts about your research (maximum 5 pages) related to the changing nature of work. Indicate whether this is a completed research project or research-in-progress. A combination of short presentations and discussions will be used to facilitate the exchange of ideas.

Potential topic areas include (but are not limited to) :
  • - Emerging new patterns of work
  • - Job crafting with IT
  • - New IT-enabled motivational strategies, e.g., gamification of work
  • - Changing spatial and temporal dimensions of work
  • - Work fragmentation
  • - Virtualization of work
  • - New forms of virtual teamwork
  • - Open collaboration
  • - e-Lancing
  • - IT and the labor market: Jobless growth
  • - Future professions
  • - Online participatory enterprises
  • - Changing leadership patterns
  • - Meaning of work and occupation
  • - Changing prestige of jobs with IT
  • - Work-life harmony using IT
  • - Increasing work accessibility with IT  Impact of IOT (Internet of Things) on work
  • - Well-being in the workplace
Workshop Keynote Speakers :
  • Carol Saunders
  • “Digital Innovation and its Impacts on Workers: Critical Issues”
Important Dates :
  • Oct. 10, 2016: Extended abstract due
  • Oct. 26, 2016: Notification of acceptance
Additional Details :
***THE SITE IS NOW CLOSED TO SUBMISSIONS***
(Paper submission site: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=cnow2016)
- Paper template: ĉCNOW4TEMPLATE-2016.DOCX (17K)
- At least one author of an accepted paper must register for the workshop. You can register for the workshop at  http://icis2016.aisnet.org/registration/.
Workshop Program Chairs :
  • Keri Larson, Louisiana State University (keri@lsu.edu)
  • Nancy L Russo, Malmö University (nancy.russo@mah.se)
Workshop Program Committee :
  • - Manju Ahuja, University of LouisvilleJP Allen, San Francisco University
  • - Nicholas Berente, University of Georgia
  • - Adela Chen, Colorado State University
  • - Sue Conger, University of Dallas
  • - Guy Fitzgerald, Loughborough University
  • - Jonny Holmström, Umeå University
  • - Daniel Nylén, Umeå University
  • - Karen Patten, University of South CarolinaSteve Sawyer, Syracuse University
  • - Martha Snyder, Nova Southeastern UniversityMonideepa Tarafdar, Lancaster University
  • - B.J. van den Hooff, Vrije University Amsterdam
IFIP WG 9.1 Officers :
  • Jungwoo Lee, Center for Work Science, Yonsei University
  • Stefan Klein, University of Muenster
  • Mary Beth Watson-Manheim, University of Illinois Chicago

3th Fort Worth

Fort Worth 2015: 3rd Changing Nature of Work (CNoW):Investigating ICT-Intensive Work and Consequences

The program for the workshop is available here
A zip file with all papers for the round table sessions is available here
*****
The CNoW Pre-ICIS workshop will be held at Fort Worth, Texas on December 12, 2015, Saturday. This is the third in the series: the first one was held at Milan, Italy in December 2013 and the second at Muenster, Germany in May 2015.

Notes:
The IFIP Working Group 9.1 (ICT and Work) meeting will be held in conjunction with this workshop, reflecting the increasing international interests on this field.
You are invited to submit extended abstracts about your research (maximum 5 pages). As the goal of the workshop is to exchange ideas, similar papers will be grouped and discussed together in a round table format.
Agenda (9 am to 5 pm, 2015. 12. 12):
  • - Keynote: Steven Sawyer, Professor, School of Information Studies, Syracuse University
  • - Keynote: Erran Carmel, Dean, Kogod School of Business, American University
  • - Parallel Roundtables 1, 2, 3
  • - IFIP 9.1 Business Meeting
  • - Wrap Up
Important Dates:
  • - 2015.10.31 (extended): Extended abstract or research brief due
  • - 2015.11.15 (extended): Notification of acceptance

Paper submission site : https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=cnow3
Paper template is available at the bottom of this page
Journal Special Issue with this title is currently under discussion with prestigious journals and hope to announce at the workshop. As IT has become ubiquitous and embedded in the work practices of most occupations, changes are taking place in the way work is designed, performed, coordinated and monitored.  The nature of work as defined in the industrial age is now going through tremendous change. When the nature of work changes, there are broad and deep implications for the way we live and the way our society is operating. There are implications and consequences at the individual, organizational and social levels of analysis as well as across levels. The goal of this workshop is to build a research community interested in exploring this important topic.
Potential topical areas include (but are not limited to):
  • - Emerging new patterns of work
  • - Alternative work arrangements with IT
  • - Job Crafting with IT
  • - New IT-enabled motivational strategies, e.g., gamification of work
  • - Changing spatial and temporal dimensions of work
  • - Work Fragmentation
  • - Virtualization of work
  • - New forms of virtual teamwork
  • - Open collaboration
  • - e-Lancing
  • - IT and the labor market: Jobless growth
  • - Future professions
  • - Online participatory enterprises
  • - Changing leadership patterns
  • - Meaning of work and occupation
  • - Changing prestige of jobs with IT
  • - Work Life Harmony using IT
  • At least one author of an accepted paper must register for the workshop. You can register for the workshop
    http://icis2015.aisnet.org/index.php/conference-registration.
Workshop Co-Chairs
    Jungwoo Lee, Center for Work Science, Yonsei University
    Stefan Klein, University of Muenster
    Mary Beth Watson-Manheim, University of Illinois Chicago
Workshop Committee
    JP Allen, University of San Francisco
    Peter van Baalen, Amsterdam University
    Rajendra Bandi, Indian Institute of Management Bangalore
    Gunilla Bradley, Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden
    Kathy Chudoba, University of Utah
    Sue Conger, University of Dallas
    ristine Dery, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Eric van Heck, Erasmus University
    Nam Gyoo Kim, Kookmin University
    Gyoo Gun Lim, Hanyang University
    M. Lynn Markus, Bentley University
    Hirano Masaaki, Waseda University
    Markku Nurminen, University of Turku
    Stefan Rief, Fraunhoffer Institute IAO
    Kai Riemer, University of Sydney
    Steve Sawyer, Syracuse University
    Ayoung Suh, City University of Hong Kong
    Dennis Stolz, Fraunhoffer Institute, IAO
    Simeon Vidolov, University of Muenster
    Chih-Chen Wang, National Taipei University

2nd Muenster

Muenster 2015:2nd International Workshop on the Changing Nature of Work: Working Smarter with ICT
The program for the workshop is available here
A zip file with all papers for the round table sessions is available here
*****
May 26, 09.00 – 17.00 (Leonardo-Campus 11)
This workshop will gather researchers interested in the ongoing transformation of work incurred by the fast development of information and communication infrastructures. As the nature of work is deeply embedded in the fabric of our society and life, its transformation has implications for the economy, the appreciation of work and performance, sustainability of modes of work and well-being, division of labor and specialization, education, careers and lifetime perspectives on work. Outcomes of this workshop may provide a sneak preview on new ways of working and organizing work and collaboration. The aim of the 2nd workshop will be to develop a Research Agenda on the Changing Nature of Work. The workshop will combine brief impulse presentations, round table discussions and a concluding panel. Participants will make concerted efforts to identify research areas and to develop a frameworks for future research.
You are invited to submit extended abstracts about your research (maximum 5 pages). As the goal of the workshop is to exchange ideas, similar papers will be grouped and discussed together in a round table format.
Schedule for the workshop
Day-long workshop from 9 am to 5 pm.
Panel discussion and round table sessions
Panelists
Stefan Klein, University of Muenster,, Germany
Jungwoo Lee, Yonsei University, Korea
Arjan de Kok, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
Stephan Rief, IAO Fraunhofer Institute, Stuttgart, Germany
Eric van Heck, Erasmus University, The Netherlands
Peter van Baalen, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Mary Beth Watson-Manheim, University of Illinois Chicago, USA
Kristine Dery, MIT, USA
Ella Hafermalz, University of Sydney, Australia
Rajendra Bandi, IIM Bangalore, India
Kai Riemer, University of Sydney, Australia
Ayoung Suh, City University of Hong Kong, China
Simeon Vidolov, University of Muenster, Germany
Dennis Stolze, IAO Fraunhofer Institute, Stuttgart, Germany
Nick van der Meulen, Erasmus University, The Netherlands
Ina M. Sebastian, MIT, USA
Organizers
Jungwoo Lee is a professor of Systems Management, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea. His research focuses on individual impacts of information and communication technologies. Currently, he is the director of the Center for Work Science, Yonsei University. His detail can be found at http://scholar.google.co.kr/citations?user=f11QLY0AAAAJ&hl=ko&oi=ao 
Stefan Klein is a profess of of Information Systems and Interorganisational Systems (IOS), University of Münster, Münster, Germany. His research focuses on the impact of information and communicaton infrastructures on the transformation of work, organizations, networks and industries. He has published widely and is a member of the editorial borad of several internationa IS journals

1st Milan

Milan 2013: The Changing Nature of Work:Working Smarter with ICT Pre-ICIS 2013 Workshop, 15 December 2013
Bocconi University, Milan, Italy

The program for the workshop is available here
A zip file with all papers for the round table sessions is available here
*****
The AIS Special Interest Group on Organizational Systems Research Association (SIG-OSRA) will host a Pre-ICIS 2013 Workshop for people interested in researching the transformation of work via information and communication technologies. The workshop will be held on Sunday, 15 December 2013 at Bocconi University in Milan, Italy. The theme of the workshop is “The Changing Nature of Work: Working Smarter with ICT.”
The day-long workshop will include a plenary session for completed research presentations, a series of research-in-progress paper roundtables, and lunch. Academics and practitioners are encouraged to submit research papers for the plenary and for the roundtable discussions. The best research papers will also be fast-tracked for publication in the Special Issue of the SIG-OSRA‘s Information Technology, Learning, and Performance Journal on the ‘Changing Nature of Work.’ You do not need to be a member of SIG-OSRA nor do you need to register for ICIS to contribute or attend. All research paper submissions will be peer-reviewed to determine acceptance. 
Key Dates:
Submission deadline: Wednesday, October 9, 2013, (by midnight pacific time).
Notification of acceptance: Friday, October 25, 2013 At least one author of an accepted paper must register for the SIG–OSRA Pre-ICIS 2013 Workshop to be included in the Workshop Program. You can register for SIG-OSRA Pre-ICIS 2013 Workshop as part of the ICIS or Ancillary Only Workshops registration process at http://icis2013.aisnet.org/index.php/conference-registration.
Workshop Chairs
Jungwoo Lee, Yonsei University, jlee@yonsei.ac.kr
Karen Patten, University of South Carolina, pattenk@sc.edu

Irit Hadar, University of Haifa, hadari@is.haifa.ac.il
Information Communications Technology (ICT) is fundamentally changing the way we work and live. ICT changes with whom we work through open collaboration, social connectivity, or intelligent networking. It changes what we do and how we do it affecting our quality of life as we move from manual and routine tasks to planning and venturing tasks. It allows us to work with flexible time such as freelancing or creating garage ventures. It affects where we work through telecommuting, telework, mobile work, or our home office. And, it affects the way we work, for example using knowledge-based services. New patterns of digitally-mediated business communications for employees’ collaboration, coordination, and cooperation, overcome physical differences of time and place in working with others, while new forms of freelancing and contracting of projectized knowledge intensive work is becoming a viable and sustainable alternative to the full time employment model of work. With the rise of "open" social network on the Internet, physically distributed individuals and organizations may work together on ICT platforms worldwide. Some call this new ways of working as “smart work” or “working smarter.” The focus of this SIG–OSRA Pre-ICIS 2013 Workshop is on ‘work,’ including the content and related processes of work as well as coordinating mechanisms and organizations. As the nature of work is deeply embedded in the fabric of our society and life, when its nature changes, the implicit and explicit rules of our society and lives change, including the way we assess performance, manage careers, and educate younger generations.
Invitation
We invite you to submit insights, frameworks, and cases concerning the ‘changing nature of work.’ The scope of this workshop is only limited by the imagination of its participants.  Different research approaches including conceptual, political, strategic, organizational, behavioral, economic, technical, and social perspectives are encouraged. Submissions should contribute significantly to understanding the coming ‘changing nature of work.’ Potential topics areas include (but are not limited to):
  • - Virtualization of work
  • - Virtual teams
  • - New work processes structure
  • - Gamefication of work
  • - Changing work flows
  • - Emerging patterns of work
  • - Digital mediation
  • - Telecommuting
  • - Flexible time
  • - Open collaboration and c rowd sourcing
  • - Computer mediated communications
  • - Work Design Theory
  • - Institutional Transformation
  • - Future of professions
  • - Knowledge-intensivity of work and tasks
  • - Outcome-based performance assessment
  • - Participatory business enterprises
  • - Contribution of Users/Consumers
  • - Changing leadership patterns
  • - Smart technologies
  • - Spatial and temporal dimensions of work
  • - Changing employee relation
  • - Work Fragmentation
  • - Smart services
  • - Alternative Work Arrangements
  • - e-Lancing and Precarious Work
Submission Instructions for Contributors
All papers should use the SIG-OSRA Pre-ICIS 2013 Workshop template found on the SIG-OSRA Website at www.osra.org. Submissions should be sent electronically as an email attachment to osrawork@gmail.com. Questions regarding paper submissions should be directed to the workshop chairs, preferably via email to Jungwoo Lee, jlee@yonsei.ac.kr, Karen Patten, pattenk@sc.edu, or Irit Hadar, hadari@is.haifa.ac.il.